Politics, playwork and neo-liberalism

NO. 1 IN AN ORIGINAL SERIES OF PAMPHLETS BY GORDON STURROCK In this first of an original series of pamphlets, the UK playwork scholar Gordon Sturrock argues that avoiding the political implications of playwork practice will lead to its continuing, inevitable demise. Nor should we water our politics down to accommodate more dominant discourses. Instead, … Continue reading Politics, playwork and neo-liberalism

What is playwork under neoliberalism?

In this new paper, Ben Dalbey, inspired by the writing of Wendy Russell and Mike Wragg in the recently-published Aspects of Playwork: Play & Culture Studies, Volume 14 (Hamilton Books, 2018), and quoting extensively from their work, attempts to apply some of their ideas to a US context informed by race and class. Abstract The … Continue reading What is playwork under neoliberalism?

Symbiotic homeostatic disequilibrium in playworking interaction

A new paper by Joel Seath and Gordon Sturrock, derived from and following communications at the PlayEd conference in Cambridge, May 2018. Abstract Playwork’s key claim is its unique manner of working for and with children. It currently suffers, however, from a lack of consensus regarding the benefits of its application. This paper challenges the dilution … Continue reading Symbiotic homeostatic disequilibrium in playworking interaction

‘A situated ethos of playwork’ – a response from 2008

In this critical response to Voce and Sturrock, Dr Pete KIng, highlighting a project from 2008, and his own study of it, suggests their proposals are nothing new, and that a greater emphasis is needed on the role of evidence-based research in developing playwork. The recent paper by Voce and Sturrock (2018) offers five recommendation … Continue reading ‘A situated ethos of playwork’ – a response from 2008

A situated ethos of playwork

Turning the playwork story into a narrative for change. In this new collaboration, Adrian Voce and Gordon Sturrock cast their collective eye over the recent history of playwork in the UK to draw out some lessons for the field on how it might regroup and take a leading role in making the case for a comprehensive … Continue reading A situated ethos of playwork

What is unique about playwork?

At the launch of the Playwork Foundation in November 2017, Professor Fraser Brown described the elements of playwork practice that he identifies as unique within the children's workforce, using playwork stories to illustrate each point. He has now followed up his presentation with an expanded paper, which can be downloaded below, while the list of unique elements is set … Continue reading What is unique about playwork?

Back to the (possible) Futures of Playwork

In 2007-8 there was an ambitious project to engage the playwork field in a dialogue about its possible future, and the structures it might need to get there. Here, Adrian Voce, who, as Play England's director, initiated the project, and Dr. Pete King, who has researched it, introduce Dr. King's 2015 paper about the initiative, which we are … Continue reading Back to the (possible) Futures of Playwork

Entangled in the midst of it

A diffractive expression of an ethics for playwork by Wendy Russell Abstract The Playwork Principles establish the professional and ethical framework for UK playworkers. They also create contradictions that have an ethical dimension. Following an historical contextualisation, the chapter critiques the assumption of the autonomous rational agent implicit in the Playwork Principles’ understanding of both play … Continue reading Entangled in the midst of it